Award Winning Real Shaving Company

 

There are lots of smiles in the office this morning as we have just received the Bronze Award in the Best New Male Face Product at the 14th Pure Beauty Awards in London.

The Awards celebrate innovation and creativity within the beauty industry and rightly recognise the most exciting and efficacious products (and as you can imagine it is a long old list!) launched within the past year.

These Awards are voted by Pure Beauty’s readers and retail store staff. Many thanks to everyone who voted for The Real Shaving Company as your favourite product and brand!

www.realshaving.com

Bideford Black: The Next Generation

New art commissions to explore science, industry and society in local pigment project

Nine  artists have been selected to make new work for the Bideford Black: The Next Generation project ahead of a special exhibition at the Burton Art Gallery in October 2015.

Bideford Black is a unique pigment found only in Bideford. This project connects the heritage of the area with the tradition of using it as an artist’s material, commissioning and documenting its use by contemporary artists, developing a greater understanding of this rare material in a contemporary artistic context.

Caption: Images of Neville & Joan Gabie's research into Bideford Black in plastics production. With thanks to Hampton Plastics.  Copyright Carolyn Black

Caption: Images of Neville & Joan Gabie's research into Bideford Black in plastics production. With thanks to Hampton Plastics. Copyright Carolyn Black

On the 11th March, there will be an early opportunity to meet one of the artists at the gallery when Luce Choules will be presenting her recent alpine fieldwork project Guide74 in a special ‘performance lecture’. She will also introduce Seam, the new choreographed exhibition she is creating for Bideford Black: The Next Generation. A Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, Choules explores physical and emotional geography through experimental fieldwork.

Selected by open call last autumn, all of the artists are developing new artworks either with, or about, Bideford Black pigment, for the Burton’s permanent collection.

Devon-based artist Tabatha Andrews works in a range of media including drawing and casting forms in paper.

Artist duo ATOI, based in Cornwall, are exploring the transformation of material from one form to another. The pair are experimenting with using Bideford Black in false diamonds and even as a surface for martial arts.

Inspired by Bideford’s historic industries and their workers, and society’s pre-occupation with the natural, London-based artist Corinne Felgate will set up a temporary cottage industry at a North Devon location. Using only local natural materials, Felgate will create 100 small objects for applying ‘Bideford Black mascara’.

Prompted by Bideford Black, and using a shared sketchbook, artists Neville Gabie and Joan Gabie are holding a ‘dialogue of ideas’ with Cultural Geographer Ian Cook (University of Exeter). Together, the artists explore the physicality, social and geological significance of Bideford Black, creating an artist’s film and drawings.

Lanarkshire-based artist duo Littlewhitehead are interested in the environmental processes forming Bideford Black: what would the Carboniferous period have sounded like? Their developing commission is tightly under wraps, but may incorporate experimental sound recordings or Bideford Black discs resembling vinyl LP records.

Lizzie Ridout will set Bideford Black within a new taxonomy – or story – of the colour black. Incorporating her research into the subject, the Cornwall-based artist will create a printed publication, presented as a sculpture, pieces of which audience members may be able to take away.

The final artist, Sam Treadaway is working with Bristol botanists to create a scent inspired by Bideford Black. The scent will be interactively transmitted into the gallery space using a bubble-blowing machine developed by roboticists from the University of the West of England.

Film-maker Liberty Smith is documenting the Bideford Black: The New Generation project. As well as filming the eight artists and artist duos as they research and create their work, Liberty will film the landscape around Bideford and the North Devon coast. Smith’s film will be premiered as part of the project exhibition in October 2015.

To get an inside glimpse of those involved in the project do join the upcoming talk by Luce Choules on  11th March at 7pm at the Burton Art Gallery. This is a free admission event, but booking is advised  -  tel 01237 471455 or email burtonartgallery@torridge.gov.uk.

And another date for your diaries, “Bideford Black: The Next Generation Exhibition” opens on 3rd October at the Burton Art Gallery and Museum, Bideford, Devon, EX39 2QQ

 

 

Project Life

As I am growing older (but of course I still consider myself very young, especially when my bestfriend Bee and I take ourselves out for the night!) I have become aware of my changing position on mortality.  Difficult subject I know, and one that is not usually on a marketing blog.

Living in Devon I am surrounded by a relatively older community than in Burnham (Bucks), the village I grew up in.  In my youth, the idea of death was almost theoretical and only happened to my pets.  All of my goldfishes and rabbits were ceremoniously buried under a huge willow tree in the garden at home.  I remember death as something that would make me cry and feel sad, but I could bounce back.  Rather quickly in fact.  A glass of squash and a biscuit were always good distractions.

In my 20’s I bravely attended my Aunt’s funeral with my sister as my parents were away. I cried as soon as I saw the coffin and then huge loud sobs until the last hymn.  I had to attend the wake as I had volunteered to drive some family members.  I was hoping an ability to calmly, and with dignity, pay my last respects, would come more easily then, and indeed over the years.

During my 30’s  I would be consumed with a tsunami of sadness when I heard that someone had lost a friend or relative.  I could no longer bring myself to read order of service sheets at funerals.  My Father’s death, during this decade, is something that I still struggle to comprehend.

None of us is a stranger to death. Just this weekend I spent Saturday at a family funeral. Now in my 40’s I notice much more clearly how I am surrounded by people who can deal with death in much more rational ways than I have ever been able to, or perhaps ever will.

This morning I visited ‘Gran-Gran,’ my husband’s Grannie, who is currently a resident at a nursing home about 20 miles away. I fed her lunch, puréed roast chicken on a teaspoon, a mango yogurt, finished off with a sugary tea.  Suffering with severe dementia, Gran-Gran cannot remember me, but more sadly, she cannot remember my husband.  I found myself saying, “Simon is here today.  Simon has come to see you.”  Blankly Gran-Gran looked up, and after some time she said, “Simon.”  There was a slight smile.  Tears were streaming down my face.  Gran-Gran could remember Simon.

Perhaps there are times when death is simply the next chapter.  A release onto another journey. Poignantly, as I left the nursing home a 99 year old resident, of sound mind, who is bright as a button said to me “enjoy yourself, you are at a great age, I was in full health until I was 75, they were my great years.”

It’s official then, I have 33 great years ahead of me! With that thought I opened my notebook got out my favourite Sharpie marker and quietly started to write my 33 year plan – there is a lot of be done!

So as I kick off “Project Life’ top of my list is to live purposefully and with as much gusto as I can muster!  Following closely behind are plans and ideas that could grace the pages of Marketing Week!

To quote Napoleon Hill, “What the mind of man can see and believe, it can achieve.”

Now, let’s get on!

 

 

The Living Art of Wood Engraving

Hilary Paynter’s commitment to craftsmanship and artistic innovation

Having earned a reputation for creativity, excellence, skilled craftsmanship and distinctiveness of design, wood engraving is valued for its sense of heritage and quality.  Prized by collectors the world over, wood engraving, a very old form of printmaking, has an international reach extending way beyond its English roots.

Last week I had the privilege of meeting Bideford based artist, wood engraver and Chairman of the Society of Wood Engravers, Hilary Paynter.  Hilary’s subject matter ranges from rugged coastal scenery such as Clovelly harbour to dramatic landscapes, often portraying distinctive geological forms to domestic observations and controversial socio-political commentary that are intellectually subtle.

Meeting at Hilary’s home studio overlooking the River Torridge, I was blown away by Hilary’s beautiful nineteenth-century iron press, her busy studio, the prints, which were everywhere, piled up to be framed, the hive of activity, but also the calmness of the space.  Hilary graciously gave me a studio tour and took the time to talk through the process she uses when engraving, humbly sharing her little tips and tricks!

For those ‘non-woodengravers’ amongst us, simply, you take a piece of wood, specifically “boxwood,” and then layer paint on one side. Once the paint is set you painstakingly etch away with millions of score marks using a sharp tool called a  “spit sticker’ until you have created a final design. The raised surface is then coated in a fine layer of ink and once through the press prints directly on paper.  In addition, wood engravers need to remember that the image cut on the block is the reverse of the final print. Like any true professional, Hilary made it sound and look so easy!

When asked what her most proud moment has been, Hilary’s face beamed, “I was commissioned to undertake a suite of 14 wood engravings “From the Rivers to the Sea” to commemorate the 250th anniversary of Thomas Bewick, the inventor of wood engraving.  This suite was enlarged from small wood blocks to panels that are 2 metres high by 22 metres wide, and installed on the Metro platforms at the Central Station, Newcastle,” said Hilary.  Hilary proudly shared the images of her installation in situ at the station.  Some of the images showed commuters at the station rushing crazily past. The irony of the absurd acceleration of our lives, in contrast to timeless calm of a wood engraved installation struck.

We now live and work in flux; technologies and markets come and go, converge and fragment at unbelievable speed and in unpredictable ways.  Has technology made us all feel overwhelmed by the relentless demands in our lives? How refreshing then to come across Hilary and the world of wood engravers in which masterpieces are made one dash at a time, with the very same tools, and with the very same speed, as those made over 100 years ago.

Hilary is a truly inspirational artist who has quietly developed her working life with incredible vision and purpose.  Hilary can see things from a different point of view, which I think liberates and stimulates her to think differently.  Hilary’s work is real and “human” in this fast paced, robotic world we live in.

For those of you in North Devon this week why not take time go for a walk along the Tarka Trail in Bideford and make new connections.  Sit and watch the River Torridge from Victoria Park, take time, observe and ponder how you would draw what you see, or indeed how you would create that image as a wood engraving.  If you need further inspiration, visit the Burton Art Gallery from July 26 – September 15 to view Hilary’s work, alongside other wood engravers in The Society of Wood Engravers 76th Annual Exhibition.

Things you may not know about Hilary Paynter

Hilary started her working career as teacher and in the evenings had a hobby as a stone-carver, which she enjoyed.  However with two small children at home, and this hobby taking place in her kitchen, complaints followed from the family of grit in the food resulting in her giving this hobby up!

Her favourite “job” was working with “stroppy kids” in an education unit in Hammersmith of teenage boys, all of whom had been expelled from school.  Hilary enjoyed helping these children, whose previous points of reference were failure, sharing with them all forms of art, including sculpture, watching them grow and become more accepting of themselves and life.

Every year Hilary is creating between 40 -50 pieces of work, ranging from huge public installations to small illustrations.

Hilary is currently the Chairman of the Wood engravers Society and the President of the Royal Society of Painter-Printmakers.

1n 1982 Hilary created the societies first exhibition, for many years,  ‘The Revival” at the Garden Gallery in Kew.  This was the start of the touring exhibitions which are still going strongly today, with, on average 6 exhibitions a year.

Venue Contact Details:

The Society of Wood Engravers 76th Annual Exhibition at The Burton Art Gallery is on until 15 September 2014 at THE BURTON ART GALLERY & MUSEUM, Kingsley Road, Bideford EX39 2QQ. burtonartgallery@torridge.gov.uk   01237 471455  www.burtonartgallery.co.uk

Opening Hours:  Monday – Saturday, 10am – 4pm, Sunday 11am – 4pm.

 

Crafty Activities for the School Holidays at the Burton

Children’s Workshops  (July – September 2014)

Six weeks is a long time to keep anyone entertained, let alone your toughest critics. Don’t panic, though, for those of you in North Devon, the Burton Art Gallery and Museum has got this year’s school summer holidays (24th July – 3rd September) sorted.

Bideford’s Burton Art Gallery has just announced their  “Summer School,” a huge variety of art workshops, all led by local artists, taking place across the holidays.

The eclectic range of creative activities for young people aged 3 to 11 year olds, and families, in its fully equipped contemporary workshop studio include drop-ins, art workshops and craft courses. Families are also encouraged to explore the gallery and museum using the free and self-guided Burton Family Trail (all ages).

Here is a preview of some of the workshops taking place:

Ghostly Sculptural Gadgets

Tuesday 29th July 10am – 4pm £15 Re-create everyday objects from umbrellas to tennis rackets, using a wire frame and tissue paper. Tour the museum and choose your favourite artefact to produce ghostly replicas.

Mad Mechanical Moving Models

Tuesday 5th August 10am – 4pm £15 Create simple moving models using levers and handles from painted & decorated card and recycled materials – mad, crazy characters of your choosing!

‘Up’ Cycled Accessories

Wednesday 13th August 10am – 4pm £15 One person’s trash is another’s treasure, and this couldn’t be more true with all of the emerging artists tapping into the creation of upcycled accessories.  Make your own original necklaces, bracelets, bags or brooches from throw-aways!

Ship Ahoy!

Friday 22nd August 10am – 4pm,  £15 Create a ship or seaside scene in a bottle, taking inspiration from Bideford’s rich maritime history.

Fat & Flat Fish Wednesday 27th August 10am – 4pm £15. Make colourful 3D paper fish; from sardines to sharks or even a whole shoal, hang your creation from a fishing wire to proudly display at home.

Windsock Whimsies

Friday 29th August 10am – 4pm £15 Create a fun windsock animal, fish or insect that will catch the wind & can fly all the way home with you!

Crafty Kids

Every Monday throughout the summer (except August Bank Holiday) from 10am – 12noon there are simple, fun and effective activities in the Crafty Kids class for under 5’s and their families.

Art Trolley

Out and about in the galleries every day of the school holidays, the Art Trolley is the perfect way to get creative at the Burton.  Free activity for you to enjoy.

Young Friends Art Group

On the last Saturday of every month, local artists run themed arts and crafts workshops. £1 donation per child.

Teresa Turner, Local Artist and on of the Workshop Leaders, said “I am really looking forward to the Summer School.  On Saturday I ran the Young Friends Art Group children’s workshop in conjunction with the Heritage Day taking place in Victoria Park.  The children learnt how to make their own book and then designed images across the book in relation to the heritage of Bideford and the surrounding area.  Children included, amongst many other things, Bideford Bridge, Bideford Pots, Hockings ice-creams, Bideford Bay, ships and dolphins.  I was blown away by the children’s knowledge of the Bideford area and how they confidently visualized that knowledge in the books that they created.  As always, an amazing display of young artist talent.”

Miranda Clarke, Visual Arts Manager at the Burton Art Gallery and Museum said, “We’ve got lots of gorgeous summer arts and craft activities for children at the Burton, and I am looking forward to seeing all the creativity from the children in the area, the next generation of artists!” 

So if the rain is beating against the window and you’ve got cooped-up, bored children on your hands, or if the sunshine has stayed and you need to do something other than a “beach-day,” then booking in a workshop at the Burton might be just the ticket!

To book a place contact The Burton on 01237 471455 or download a booking form from

www.burtonartgallery.co.uk.

Venue Contact Details:
THE BURTON ART GALLERY & MUSEUM, Kingsley Road, Bideford EX39 2QQ
(e) burtonartgallery@torridge.gov.uk   (t) 01237 471455 (w) www.burtonartgallery.co.uk

Opening Hours:

Monday – Saturday, 10am – 4pm, Sunday 11am – 4pm.

 

Is your business Thoroughly British?

Thoroughly British, a new website which will launch in January 2014, is dedicated to stocking the best of britain. The website, a brainchild of Linn Gustavsson, will only feature designers that 100% manufacture their products here in the UK.  The consumer offering will celebrate provenance and quality from British designers.  Labels that are known to be included are Evocha, Doe Leather, Yull, Charlotte Lucy, Z-Mode and Stella + Alf.  

So if your brand fits the bill, don’t miss out.  http://www.thoroughlybritish.co.uk

Cowshed’s Calf – Cheeky!

Beauty brand Cowshed is celebrating their 15th birthday by launching a new brand, Cheeky. Cheeky is to take High Street distribution, plus stand alone stores. Think manicures and blow-drys that are quick on time, cheap on cash but with no compromise on quality, launches end October. Positioning is spot on.

 

Lucy Goaman

Charlotte’s Beauty Festival

Whilst Glastonbury Festival is getting ready to go into full swing, another festival is taking the world by storm!!  Can you remember when you last saw a beauty brand launch?  And launch with huge razzmatazz?  The infamous Charlotte Tilbury has her own Beauty Festival in Selfridges this week, as a teaser, ahead of her line “Charlotte Tilbury” launching in September.

A luxe line.  A different line.  A line created by an expert in the trade.  Someone who has worked on nearly every famous face.  A lady who knows how to be different.  For example, when the world is used to Nail Bars, Charlotte introduces Eye Bars.

Team Tilbury will be on hand every day this week, in Selfridges, from 10am – 10pm (except 5.30-8pm) to offer free eye looks to anyone who comes to the event.  There are 5 signature looks to choose from:

The Feline Flick (a la Kate Moss)

A Chocolate Smoky Eye (think Sophia Loren)

A Pop of Colour (my inspiration is Jerry Hall and Studio 54)

A Rock ‘n’ Kohl legend eye (think Rihanna in V magazine)

Or a Disco Glamour (channel the sexiness and sophistication of Paris Vogue)

After being made over, you can have your photo added to the wall of fame.  And one lucky winner on the fame wall will be chosen to model in Charlotte’s next You Tube make over tutorial.

 Every day there is a different style of event, and for something quite quirky, on Thursday there is going to be free lipstick readings with psychics in residence, The Psychic Sisters. Who knew that your lipstick print could tell you so much about your psyche and your future..?

Charlotte has a great collection of celeb friends to help support her new brand launch, many will be popping up during the week at Selfridges.

I am loving her new make up bag, endorsed by a few friends!!  All the proceeds from the bag are going to Kids Company.

 

 

 

Looking forward to seeing this brand grow and I am sure it will become a marketing benchmark for many other beauty brands.

http://www.charlottetilbury.com/

Lucy Goaman

Urgent or important….

 

After a week of being surrounded by people under a lot of pressure, whether it is to achieve a business award from a major retailer for a new cosmetic product, or preparing for an event with nearly 1,000 children attending, things have been hotting up!

And then Red Nose Day arrives to remind us all of what’s important in life.

 

Lucy Goaman

www.marketingandprclinic.com

 

Does Lloyds have an Olympic Legacy?

One month ago I was enjoying watching the Paralympics rowing at Eton Dorney.  The fabulous sportsmen and women, the sunshine, the bongoCam, the crowds, the omnipresent sponsors, and the #DorneyRoar!

One month on I find myself in the queue of my local Lloyds branch on Bideford High Street, in Devon.

 

 

The queue took a little time, so I had a good look around the branch.  There were 6 counters, 2 members of staff.  There was a new deposit machine. There were paying in slips.  Pens.  A couple of desk areas, semi private where you could discuss your finances with an advisor.  But to me, there was something missing. Something big and important missing.  Had Lloyds forgotten the Olympics and the promise to “Inspire a Generation” and to work in legacies at numerous levels?  There was nothing.  Nothing at all which reflected on the summer of celebrations, which began with the torch relay from Lloyds “For the Journey” campaign.   Was the journey over now Coldplay have left the stage?

The Olympics provided a summer of opportunities for the brands which were intrinsically linked via their sponsorship packages.  They were bound by rules and guidelines.  Now the Olympics are over surely the sponsor brands have a duty to drive the legacy? So come on Lloyds, when I go into my branch, I want to be reminded of the competitive spirit and excitement of the Games.  I want you as a bank to stand apart. I want to know I am in Lloyds, rather than NatWest.  I want to be able to read about the 7.8 million young people from more than 19,600 schools who have taken part in Lloyds TSB National School Sport Week, and the 4.3 million young people you have helped try out Olympic and Paralympics sports. I want to know what’s next.  How your brand is looking beyond London 2012? I am all ears. I am in your queue. Update me, entertain me with all your post Olympic news. Make me feel like I was back in Eton, admidst the #DorneyRoar!

This was also a strong reminder to me that all brands need to talk to their customers at all interfaces, even the very old fashioned ones, such as queues!  And communicate from a position of competitive advantage, and what better platform for a brand, than the afterglow of an outstanding Olympics.

 

Lucy Goaman