5 years after the Brexit referendum, 25% of people would change their vote

5 years after the Brexit referendum, 25% of people would change their vote

Today marks the fifth anniversary of the Brexit referendum where the British people voted to leave the European Union. With this in mind, KIS Finance conducted a survey which asked 2,000 people whether they would change their vote if they had a second opportunity.

Key statistics

•25% of those who voted in the referendum would now change their vote.

•11.4% of those who voted Leave would now vote Remain.

•13.6% of those who voted Remain would now vote Leave.

•16.7% of those who didn’t vote would now vote Leave.

•39% of those who didn’t vote would now vote Remain.

The survey revealed that 25% of those who voted in the referendum would now change their vote.

This is made up of:

•11.4% of those who voted Leave would now vote Remain
•13.6% of those who voted Remain would now vote Leave

However, perhaps even more notably, out of those who didn’t vote in the referendum:

•16.7% wish they had voted Leave
•39% wish they had voted Remain.

It is estimated that Brexit cost the UK economy £400m – £800m per week by the end of 2019. The survey respondents were given this information so it could be taken into consideration when making their decision.

This is a staggering cost after the Leave party won partially on the promise of saving the £350m per week sent to the EU and using that to fund the NHS instead.

This data has clearly had a significant impact on how people feel towards leaving the EU.

Based on these survey results, the outcome of the 2016 referendum could have been very different.

 

Lucy Goaman

Cleaner Seas Group are delighted to be at the G7 Summit Official Events

Cleaner Seas Group are delighted to be invited to showcase their innovative technology to remove microplastics from the environment at the G7 Summit.

Every time you wash your clothes in your washing machine it can release up to 700,000 Microplastic fibres (microfibres). The Cleaner Seas Group have made it their mission to find a solution to this problem.

Cleaner Seas Group’s mission is to rid the environment of microplastic pollution, has led to the by development of best in class technology products that remove and capture micro and nano plastics from any washing machine.

The G7 Expo at Cornwall House runs between 9-14 June. Its aim is to provide a showcase for the best the South West has to offer, shining a light on the region’s rich heritage and innovative green energy, mining, agritech, food and drink, space and aerospace.

The expo will be welcoming delegates and the World’s press and we’re looking forward to talking Cleaner Seas with them.

www.cleanerseasgroup.com

 


Tru Earth – Revolutionary strip form laundry detergent launches in the UK

 

A new category disrupting, zero waste laundry detergent, Tru Earth has launched in the UK.

The brand is on a mission to eliminate plastic laundry jugs from landfills and oceans, and their eco-strips are a smart, eco-friendly way to do your laundry.

Tru Earth is available on a subscription basis from www.truearth.uk delivered directly through your letterbox in a plastic free zero waste design, at a frequency to suit you, so no more carrying bulky laundry detergent back from the supermarket. Tru Earth subscription service means along with no plastic jug, there is 94% less transportation pollution compared to leading laundry detergent.

Delivered in a zero-waste compostable cardboard sleeve, each ultra-concentrated, hypoallergenic strip completely dissolves with your laundry in both cold and hot water. Weighing just 3 grammes per strip, Tru Earth completely eliminates heavy laundry jugs or plastic boxes and frees up cupboard space.

Clean, green, and simple! 

“Our core value at Tru Earth is that consistent small action can lead to big change in the world. When you use Tru Earth Eco-Strips, you will feel confident that you are taking care of your family, and their future on this planet.” Co-Founder Brad Liski

Uncompromising Cleaning Power

Each laundry strip packs ultra-concentrated, hypoallergenic, eco-friendly cleaning power into a tiny, pre-measured strip of liquidless laundry detergent that you just toss in the wash. Its’ low-sudsing formula works in all types of washing machines. The smart hypoallergenic laundry detergent formulation effectively seeks out and dislodges dirt molecules and stains, keeping them in suspension until they are rinsed away.

Gentle Enough for Even the Most Sensitive Skin
- Paraben-free & Phosphate-free
- Free of added dyes
- Free of chlorine bleach
- Free of 1,4-dioxane, as certified by independent laboratory tests
- Readily biodegradable in accordance with OECD 310D
- Hypoallergenic, certified by independent dermatologists
- Vegan: no animal-based ingredients or testing on animals by us or our ingredient suppliers

Available in 3 styles; Baby, Fresh Linen and Fragrance Free, choose from 32, 64 and a 384 washes pack sizes. For serious stains try Platinum, Tru Earth ultra concentrated 32 wash packs in Fresh Linen or Fragrance Free.

Available to purchase online at www.truearth.uk

There is not enough available land to hit UK tree-planting targets


There is a large hole in the amount of available land to hit UK tree-planting targets, NGOs urgently call on Corporate Landowners to get involved to accelerate action.

New eco-transparency platform Vana finds the corporate landowners who own 130.9% of potential woodland opportunities land needed to hit England tree-planting targets


The UK has set out ambitious targets to establish forests in areas where there was no previous tree cover. For England, this is 180,000 hectares (336,372 football fields) by 2042. Recently the UK Government has committed to 30,000 hectares per year by the end of this Parliament. But the targets are behind plan[3], as it is proving difficult to access available land. Whilst officials have knowledge of where suitable land is geographically located[4], the challenge is the lack of knowledge of who owns it.

However, the game changed when HM Land Registry made their corporate land ownership data for England and Wales available for innovative start-ups. CEO Jaya Chakrabarti of B Corp  tech social enterprise Semantrica Ltd devised a cunning plan to rapidly increase the rate of afforestation and nature restoration in the UK, using that data and supply chain transparency legislation to do it.

The app, named Vana (the Sanskrit word for forest, wood, grove, spring, abundance), aims to bring together tree-planting climate activist groups, government funding and corporate entities with environmentally critical landholdings. The land identified using the Vana system will then be used to drive projects to increase tree coverage and/or other rewilding action in the UK where landowners are willing. Whilst still a prototype it has already been dubbed a “carbon inset dating agency” by some. Corporates committed to proactive climate action are invited to take their first step by registering their interest with the Vana platform (https://projectvana.org/).

Data Cuttings from the Vana Prototype:
The Vana prototype connects multiple open data and silo data sources with live supply chain data, enabling the team to confirm that 29,792 corporate entities own 130.9% of the right type of land required to achieve afforestation targets in England alone. This is only 5% of total corporate landholdings, hardly making a dent in those aggregated land assets. Put another way, Vana has confirmed that corporates are overwhelmingly the best hope of enabling the UK to hit its tree-planting targets.

Unsurprisingly their prototype confirms that the top three sectors owning woodland opportunity land were Agriculture, Forestry & Fishing, Real Estate Activities and Construction. But more importantly, Vana has identified fragments of land all over England and Wales across all sectors that could be used to hit those ambitious targets. This “long tail” fills in many of the missing puzzle pieces, including which group structures and supply chains some of those entities are a part of.

Drawing from their experience in corporate compliance the team have identified which of the companies in scope of the UK Modern Slavery Act (companies over £36M turnover) own 23.8% of the 2042 target for England. The data can also be cut regionally, showing that in the South West of England 6601 organisations own 26% of the England 2042 target.

The Vana engine is already powerful enough to pull in other data sets and overlay them to address other environmental targets. Everything from flood risk mitigation to district heating planning proposals can be analysed through the corporate land and building ownership lens. Vana will use all available data to prioritise the lowest hanging fruit to achieve the most impact quickly.

What Vana is doing next and how to support it:
Now that Vana has successfully established the business case, the team needs funding to transform the prototype into a fully functioning platform to support working with corporates leading on afforestation and reforestation. Organisations wishing to support Vana can do so by pre-subscribing to the platform at a significantly discounted rate, or by sponsoring a live reporting map, region by region, showing afforestation and nature restoration opportunities and live projects as they get going.

https://techfund.tiscreport.org/project/vana-the-afforestation-and-reforestation-data-app/

Says Jaya, “We felt that the best place to start is by providing complete visibility on what is happening in the country right now. Not only would it help organisations and activists decide where they should be putting their efforts, but it would also help policymakers see the impact of current policy geospatially. As a B Corp social enterprise in need of funds to achieve our mission, this kills two birds with one stone.”

Project Vana aims to help on-the-ground technologies connect faster with climate-conscious corporate customers, again to accelerate impact. Innovative solutions companies are encouraged to make contact to form part of what Vana calls its “mycelium network” of high impact cleantech companies.

Time is of the essence. As Jaya says: “The human race is on. It’s the only one we have to win and it cannot be won without going beyond fixing what we have broken.”

Shopping for Christmas

 

This morning I was listening to Amanda Holden on Heart FM as she decided the time had come to kick off Christmas on her breakfast show!  She started playing some reassuringly familiar Christmas songs, and for a little while, everything felt reassuringly familiar.

Retailers will be hoping that reassuring sense of a traditional Christmas will be be matched by consumer shopping habits this season.

A large part of any retailer’s annual sales and profits occurs in the three months before Christmas. For this to work perfectly, retailers know that having the right goods at the right price in the weeks leading up to Christmas is essential. But, this is far from a perfect year for so many reasons.

For the past six years, Retail Assist has conducted its annual Black Friday survey which gives a good insight into the mind space of consumers in the last few weeks to Christmas.  Whilst Retail Assist have asked many of the usual questions, they’ve added more questions to reflect the current COVID-19 situation and how it might affect consumer spending and behaviour.

This year, 1,200 people have been surveyed and some of the results are quite surprising, and in retail terms, there are some significant shifts predicted):
• This year, a whopping 67% of people said that they planned to shop Black Friday this year – a huge 10% rise on last year
• Whilst the majority of people (59%) said that Black Friday doesn’t usually kick start their Christmas shopping, 66% of people said that they were looking to start their Christmas shopping earlier this year
• 43% of people said that this was a budget-related decision, so they could spread the cost out. However, interestingly, the second most popular reason people chose was that it gave them something to do; as harsher restrictions were brought in in the run-up to Christmas, shopping from your sofa has become entertainment as much as necessity
• 40% of people said that they can get carried away with all the discounts – an increase of 20% from last year
• Every year, technology items have always been the most popular choice – but not this year. Clothes were the standalone winner at 55%, with beauty buys at 31% and technology shrinking to 24% of respondents.

To all colleagues who I have worked with on the seasonal gifting market, I do hope this is a good one for you.  And to all friends who run fabulous boutique businesses which desperately depend on Christmas sales, I hope you get the bumper Christmas you so dearly need and deserve.

 

Share of Voice Online vs Share of Time

 

 Has the rise of digital technology had an impact on your business, and your life?  Has it given you more time or eaten it away?

For many of us the day is now a 24-hour operation, no longer the 8.30am – 6pm days of old. My Withings watch reliably informs me every morning that I have clocked less and less sleep. My phone beeps and lists for me all the updates and communications activity across multiple channels for numerous brands since my head hit the pillow 6 hours before. And so the day begins.

Marketers are undoubtedly working significantly longer hours as technology advances, perversely. In many businesses marketers are required to be ‘on’ a lot more, with real-time messaging and communications, as the battle for the share of voice online heightens. As technology provides greater flexibility, and in many cases far greater accessibility to brands, and the teams behind the brands, demand on content and time has dramatically risen.

In the ‘good old days’ when annual brand and media plans were crafted, aligned and signed off, everything was rather more scheduled and prescribed.  A TV ad would air on a known day with pre determined frequency and channel list to a well research audience profile. A product line would launch after 18 months of hard toil. A brand team would leave the office each evening knowing that they could switch off, socialise and return the following day to the office with a certain degree of predictability in regards to work tasks.  (Unless Asda has decided today is the day they are going to slash the price of blades in their razor category with a national advertising campaign causing anarchy across the UK retailers, and you are sitting in the Gillette office at the other end of the buyers’ phone.  Eek.  Trust me, it wasn’t a day that was predicted!)

Today social media influencers are becoming a go-to option for generating consumer trust and credibility.  Move over Superbowl advertisers, peer to peer brand ambassadors such as Zoella are storming ahead.  In the beauty markets content creators have been widely employed for a number of years, ahead of most other industries.  Indeed over the coming years I predict that brands will start moving significant spend to social media influencers. Unlike offices, social media does not close. It never sleeps.

As I watch influencers’ profiles shift on a daily basis to ever increasing followers, and new posts and opinions updating every second, it is a beast that needs careful control.

For the newbies the race for the largest number of followers is well and truly on. Like all channels though I question whether reach via quantity of followers (most especially referring to empty paid for followers) should ever be overlooked for quality and credibility of influencer.  For the brands I associate, I most definitely choose depth of relevance and experience ahead of popularity to ensure a long-term audience growth.

So back to that old subject of work-life balance, even writing it seems so old now.  Work becomes your life. For many of the marketers I know, their lives have never been more fulfilled, especially the most entrepreneurial marketers. Social media content creators open up unlimited possibilities, provoke debate, inspire people to dream more, learn more, make change happen, create movement, entice action and shape minds.

I actually don’t mind losing a little sleep for that.

Award Winning Real Shaving Company

 

There are lots of smiles in the office this morning as we have just received the Bronze Award in the Best New Male Face Product at the 14th Pure Beauty Awards in London.

The Awards celebrate innovation and creativity within the beauty industry and rightly recognise the most exciting and efficacious products (and as you can imagine it is a long old list!) launched within the past year.

These Awards are voted by Pure Beauty’s readers and retail store staff. Many thanks to everyone who voted for The Real Shaving Company as your favourite product and brand!

www.realshaving.com

Bideford Black: The Next Generation

New art commissions to explore science, industry and society in local pigment project

Nine  artists have been selected to make new work for the Bideford Black: The Next Generation project ahead of a special exhibition at the Burton Art Gallery in October 2015.

Bideford Black is a unique pigment found only in Bideford. This project connects the heritage of the area with the tradition of using it as an artist’s material, commissioning and documenting its use by contemporary artists, developing a greater understanding of this rare material in a contemporary artistic context.

Caption: Images of Neville & Joan Gabie's research into Bideford Black in plastics production. With thanks to Hampton Plastics.  Copyright Carolyn Black

Caption: Images of Neville & Joan Gabie's research into Bideford Black in plastics production. With thanks to Hampton Plastics. Copyright Carolyn Black

On the 11th March, there will be an early opportunity to meet one of the artists at the gallery when Luce Choules will be presenting her recent alpine fieldwork project Guide74 in a special ‘performance lecture’. She will also introduce Seam, the new choreographed exhibition she is creating for Bideford Black: The Next Generation. A Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, Choules explores physical and emotional geography through experimental fieldwork.

Selected by open call last autumn, all of the artists are developing new artworks either with, or about, Bideford Black pigment, for the Burton’s permanent collection.

Devon-based artist Tabatha Andrews works in a range of media including drawing and casting forms in paper.

Artist duo ATOI, based in Cornwall, are exploring the transformation of material from one form to another. The pair are experimenting with using Bideford Black in false diamonds and even as a surface for martial arts.

Inspired by Bideford’s historic industries and their workers, and society’s pre-occupation with the natural, London-based artist Corinne Felgate will set up a temporary cottage industry at a North Devon location. Using only local natural materials, Felgate will create 100 small objects for applying ‘Bideford Black mascara’.

Prompted by Bideford Black, and using a shared sketchbook, artists Neville Gabie and Joan Gabie are holding a ‘dialogue of ideas’ with Cultural Geographer Ian Cook (University of Exeter). Together, the artists explore the physicality, social and geological significance of Bideford Black, creating an artist’s film and drawings.

Lanarkshire-based artist duo Littlewhitehead are interested in the environmental processes forming Bideford Black: what would the Carboniferous period have sounded like? Their developing commission is tightly under wraps, but may incorporate experimental sound recordings or Bideford Black discs resembling vinyl LP records.

Lizzie Ridout will set Bideford Black within a new taxonomy – or story – of the colour black. Incorporating her research into the subject, the Cornwall-based artist will create a printed publication, presented as a sculpture, pieces of which audience members may be able to take away.

The final artist, Sam Treadaway is working with Bristol botanists to create a scent inspired by Bideford Black. The scent will be interactively transmitted into the gallery space using a bubble-blowing machine developed by roboticists from the University of the West of England.

Film-maker Liberty Smith is documenting the Bideford Black: The New Generation project. As well as filming the eight artists and artist duos as they research and create their work, Liberty will film the landscape around Bideford and the North Devon coast. Smith’s film will be premiered as part of the project exhibition in October 2015.

To get an inside glimpse of those involved in the project do join the upcoming talk by Luce Choules on  11th March at 7pm at the Burton Art Gallery. This is a free admission event, but booking is advised  -  tel 01237 471455 or email burtonartgallery@torridge.gov.uk.

And another date for your diaries, “Bideford Black: The Next Generation Exhibition” opens on 3rd October at the Burton Art Gallery and Museum, Bideford, Devon, EX39 2QQ

 

 

The Art of Paper Cutting

Mix up a Saturday, 7 people, a pile of cutting boards, blades and a stack of black paper and you get the most inspired day doing something totally different.

I have just returned from a “Paper-Cutting” course at the Burton Art Gallery, Bideford, with the artist Caroline Rees.  Textile design student Caroline Rees has evolved her career as a sandblasted glass artist into a paper cut artist over the last few years and was in Devon to share her deceptively simply technique of making papercuts.

Photo credit: Simon Williams

So after the basic introductions, and the amazement that Caroline had travelled from Swansea to Bideford to run the course for us, we set to work practicing cutting out simple squares on a piece of black paper on the chopping mat, using the blade.  In no time, most of the class were ready to move onto working on an image.  For some, this was hand drawing an outline and being smart enough to work out how to simplify the image and block it out ready for cutting.  For the rest of us we found an appealing stencil in Caroline’s collection, outlined the image on black paper and then, almost in a therapeutic trance, cut around the multitude of lines to reveal a stunning image.

For me the appeal of paper cutting is that you don’t need to be an artist, in fact, you don’t even need to be able to draw.  The equipment will cost you less than a tenner (cutting board, blade and some paper) and the results are astonishing.  All you need is time, actually hours of time, to master the real art of cutting perfect, intricate, tiny shapes.  Trust me, I was in awe of the lady working alongside me who was able to cut out weenie circles to make the buds on her flower pattern (SO difficult).

Paper cutting – the beginners’ steps.

1)   Purchase a cutting board, blade and black paper.

2)   Think about what you want to draw.  For me it was tough to sit and really think about what image I wanted to create.

3)   Create an outline by hand or from a stencil.

4)   Break it down into small parts and work out how each part would need to be cut.

5)   Then have fun and start cutting out the image from the smallest parts first.  Be patient.

 

The draw? The desire to learn something new, something frivolous in Bideford.

The attraction? A skill that requires no digitization, just the work of the human hand.  And Caroline Rees – like the art of paper cuts, is enchanting.

The result?  A huge sense of personal accomplishment as the image emerges from blank piece of paper revealing something I can hang on my kitchen wall with pride!  And the relief that I now know what I am going to get everyone for Christmas!

So if you fancy having a go at paper cutting, and you missed this course, there is a small selection of paper cutting books on sale at the Burton Art Gallery shop.  But if paper cutting isn’t for you, then Caroline’s limited edition paper cuts are also on sale at the Burton.

For details on upcoming workshops at the Burton Art Gallery visit: www.burtonartgallery.co.uk

Venue Contact Details:
THE BURTON ART GALLERY & MUSEUM, Kingsley Road, Bideford EX39 2QQ
(e) burtonartgallery@torridge.gov.uk   (t) 01237 471455 (w) www.burtonartgallery.co.uk

Opening Hours: Monday – Saturday, 10am – 4pm, Sunday 11am – 4pm.

Artist Contact Details:
CAROLINE REES, Studio (by appointment), Ty Glas, 2a Overland Road, Langland, Swansea, SA3 4LS

(e)info@blastedglass.co.uk  (t)01792 447 547 (w) www.blastedglass.co.uk

 

 

Lucy Goaman

Project Life

As I am growing older (but of course I still consider myself very young, especially when my bestfriend Bee and I take ourselves out for the night!) I have become aware of my changing position on mortality.  Difficult subject I know, and one that is not usually on a marketing blog.

Living in Devon I am surrounded by a relatively older community than in Burnham (Bucks), the village I grew up in.  In my youth, the idea of death was almost theoretical and only happened to my pets.  All of my goldfishes and rabbits were ceremoniously buried under a huge willow tree in the garden at home.  I remember death as something that would make me cry and feel sad, but I could bounce back.  Rather quickly in fact.  A glass of squash and a biscuit were always good distractions.

In my 20’s I bravely attended my Aunt’s funeral with my sister as my parents were away. I cried as soon as I saw the coffin and then huge loud sobs until the last hymn.  I had to attend the wake as I had volunteered to drive some family members.  I was hoping an ability to calmly, and with dignity, pay my last respects, would come more easily then, and indeed over the years.

During my 30’s  I would be consumed with a tsunami of sadness when I heard that someone had lost a friend or relative.  I could no longer bring myself to read order of service sheets at funerals.  My Father’s death, during this decade, is something that I still struggle to comprehend.

None of us is a stranger to death. Just this weekend I spent Saturday at a family funeral. Now in my 40’s I notice much more clearly how I am surrounded by people who can deal with death in much more rational ways than I have ever been able to, or perhaps ever will.

This morning I visited ‘Gran-Gran,’ my husband’s Grannie, who is currently a resident at a nursing home about 20 miles away. I fed her lunch, puréed roast chicken on a teaspoon, a mango yogurt, finished off with a sugary tea.  Suffering with severe dementia, Gran-Gran cannot remember me, but more sadly, she cannot remember my husband.  I found myself saying, “Simon is here today.  Simon has come to see you.”  Blankly Gran-Gran looked up, and after some time she said, “Simon.”  There was a slight smile.  Tears were streaming down my face.  Gran-Gran could remember Simon.

Perhaps there are times when death is simply the next chapter.  A release onto another journey. Poignantly, as I left the nursing home a 99 year old resident, of sound mind, who is bright as a button said to me “enjoy yourself, you are at a great age, I was in full health until I was 75, they were my great years.”

It’s official then, I have 33 great years ahead of me! With that thought I opened my notebook got out my favourite Sharpie marker and quietly started to write my 33 year plan – there is a lot of be done!

So as I kick off “Project Life’ top of my list is to live purposefully and with as much gusto as I can muster!  Following closely behind are plans and ideas that could grace the pages of Marketing Week!

To quote Napoleon Hill, “What the mind of man can see and believe, it can achieve.”

Now, let’s get on!