Share of Voice Online vs Share of Time

 

 Has the rise of digital technology had an impact on your business, and your life?  Has it given you more time or eaten it away?

For many of us the day is now a 24-hour operation, no longer the 8.30am – 6pm days of old. My Withings watch reliably informs me every morning that I have clocked less and less sleep. My phone beeps and lists for me all the updates and communications activity across multiple channels for numerous brands since my head hit the pillow 6 hours before. And so the day begins.

Marketers are undoubtedly working significantly longer hours as technology advances, perversely. In many businesses marketers are required to be ‘on’ a lot more, with real-time messaging and communications, as the battle for the share of voice online heightens. As technology provides greater flexibility, and in many cases far greater accessibility to brands, and the teams behind the brands, demand on content and time has dramatically risen.

In the ‘good old days’ when annual brand and media plans were crafted, aligned and signed off, everything was rather more scheduled and prescribed.  A TV ad would air on a known day with pre determined frequency and channel list to a well research audience profile. A product line would launch after 18 months of hard toil. A brand team would leave the office each evening knowing that they could switch off, socialise and return the following day to the office with a certain degree of predictability in regards to work tasks.  (Unless Asda has decided today is the day they are going to slash the price of blades in their razor category with a national advertising campaign causing anarchy across the UK retailers, and you are sitting in the Gillette office at the other end of the buyers’ phone.  Eek.  Trust me, it wasn’t a day that was predicted!)

Today social media influencers are becoming a go-to option for generating consumer trust and credibility.  Move over Superbowl advertisers, peer to peer brand ambassadors such as Zoella are storming ahead.  In the beauty markets content creators have been widely employed for a number of years, ahead of most other industries.  Indeed over the coming years I predict that brands will start moving significant spend to social media influencers. Unlike offices, social media does not close. It never sleeps.

As I watch influencers’ profiles shift on a daily basis to ever increasing followers, and new posts and opinions updating every second, it is a beast that needs careful control.

For the newbies the race for the largest number of followers is well and truly on. Like all channels though I question whether reach via quantity of followers (most especially referring to empty paid for followers) should ever be overlooked for quality and credibility of influencer.  For the brands I associate, I most definitely choose depth of relevance and experience ahead of popularity to ensure a long-term audience growth.

So back to that old subject of work-life balance, even writing it seems so old now.  Work becomes your life. For many of the marketers I know, their lives have never been more fulfilled, especially the most entrepreneurial marketers. Social media content creators open up unlimited possibilities, provoke debate, inspire people to dream more, learn more, make change happen, create movement, entice action and shape minds.

I actually don’t mind losing a little sleep for that.

Stop the Trolley!

Recognising that modern women are savvy and seriously short on time, the nation’s supermarkets have been busy compiling chic capsule beauty collections for some time.

Today’s developments in this trend has seen Tesco unveiling their new in-store beauty concept in Lincoln.  Beauty treatments are taking place alongside the weekly shop, so make sure you go to your out of town store when this goes national!

You may have also noticed that Tesco beauty teams have been investing significant energy in their social media. The brand is definitely catching up with the non-high street beauty brands. Beauty at Tesco is now on Instagram which will give followers exclusive behind the scenes shots and videos from beauty photo shoots; while offering tips from experts who work with the team, including celebrity hairdresser Leo Bancroft and nail artist Sophie Greenslade. The new look Pinterest page shows seasonal beauty collections, offering the latest images and looks. Pins link through to the Tesco site so shoppers can purchase beauty items with the click of the mouse. The brand’s Twitter page is designed to offer advice, news on product launches and Beauty World store openings.

Supermarket shopping never seemed more appealing – well done Beauty at Tesco!

https://twitter.com/beautyattesco

http://gb.pinterest.com/BeautyatTesco/

http://instagram.com/beautyattesco

Lucy Goaman

Marketing and PR Clinic

 

 

 

 

Just in time Gifting!

 

 
Soap and Glory
has just launched its ‘Yule Monty’ Christmas bag, designed by Jonathan Saunders. It contains nine full size bath, body and beauty Soap & Glory hero products such as Righteous Butter Body Butter, Peaches & Clean Deep Purifying Cleanser, Sexy Mother Pucker Lip Plumper, Fast Super Volume Mascara, and others. Strange that a brand is offering a new seasonal gifting product 6 sleeps before Christmas, I am quite sure it has given the Brand Managers sleepless nights!  However, priced at £27, vs. typical retail value of the contents in the £50-60 range, I am sure it will be a successful sell out to all the brand loyalists of this fantastic brand, and a great trial mechanic for newbies to the brand.

Lucy Goaman

Cowshed’s Calf – Cheeky!

Beauty brand Cowshed is celebrating their 15th birthday by launching a new brand, Cheeky. Cheeky is to take High Street distribution, plus stand alone stores. Think manicures and blow-drys that are quick on time, cheap on cash but with no compromise on quality, launches end October. Positioning is spot on.

 

Lucy Goaman

Bold Marketing

Just wanted to clock in! All fine here at the Marketing and PR Clinic, just been a busy few months.. sorry I have not been regularly blogging.

I have been spending my time with a wide range of businesses, mainly in Devon, from commercial agents, new product developers, charities, beauty brands, schools, and health and fitness businesses.

A similar theme amongst clients at the moment seems to be emerging. I am noticing an increased willingness to be bold and take risks with new product extensions, partnerships or simply in looking at new ways of doing business.

Often it is the marketing department that pushes decision makers into trying all things news, and now visionary thinking and willingness to take risks appears to becoming wider spread amongst businesses.

I am sure this is not just me noticing this shift, and I would really like to hear from others on whether they too are seeing businesses taking a more positive approach to taking risks, and decision makers beginning to enjoy being more bold in their marketing, to ensure their competitive advantage.

Is this the beginning of the end of austerity marketing?

 

Lucy Goaman